OUR GOAL…

…is to elevate the student from introductory to the pre-clinical or clinical use of diagnostic radiology and acquaint the student with other imaging modalities such as ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) and nuclear medicine (NM) as they are used in veterinary practice. This course will build competence in image acquisition, evaluation, and interpretation.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

1.

Learn the x-ray machine and associated equipment used to produce radiographs.

2.

Learn the basic principles of x-ray/tissue interaction and generation of radiographic images.

3.

Learn the basic principles of sound/tissue interaction and generation of a sonographic image.

4.

Learn the hazards of x-rays, and the proper safety procedure to be used when using them to make radiographs.

5.

Be able to diagnose basic diseases of large and small animals by using radiographs, radiographic special contrast procedures, and other imaging modalities including ultrasound.

6.

Learn special contrast procedures such as upper GI series, esophagrams, cystograms, urethrograms, and excretory urograms.

THE STANDARD CURRICULUM…

…is based on the curriculum developed and implemented at the University of California, Davis for the past 20+ years. A combination of lecture and discussion sets ensures students will apply the knowledge directly to relevant case material. Lectures are 50 minutes and cover targeted topic-based material. Discussion sessions are 110 minutes and use case discussions to reinforce and expand upon material delivered during accompanying lectures.

The curricular outline is suggested but is meant to act as a basic framework that can be tailored to the particular needs of each institution including the integration of regionally relevant topics.

BLOCK

SESSION

TITLE

Basic principles of imaging Lecture Principles of radiology
Lecture X-ray production and machines
Lecture kVp, mAs, and detectors
Lecture Introduction to ultrasound
Musculoskeletal imaging Lecture Terminology and positioning
Lecture Developmental and degenerative disease
Discussion Musculoskeletal case discussion
Lecture Patterns of aggressive bone lesions
Discussion Musculoskeletal case discussion
Lecture Neuroradiology, CT and MRI
Discussion Neuroimaging discussion
Lecture Equine imaging (forelimb)
Lecture Equine imaging (hindlimb)
Discussion Equine case discussion
Abdominal imaging Lecture Basic abdominal ultrasound
Lecture Approach to abdominal radiographs
Lecture Imaging of liver and spleen
Discussion Liver/spleen case discussion
Lecture Imaging of GI tract and pancreas
Discussion GI/pancreas case discussion
Lecture Imaging of the upper urinary tract
Lecture Imaging of the lower urinary tract
Discussion Urinary tract case discussion
Thoracic imaging Lecture Approach to thoracic radiographs
Lecture Cardiac radiography
Lecture Echocardiography
Discussion Cardiac imaging case discussion
Lecture Upper airway/thoracic cavity imaging
Discussion Upper airway/thorax case discussion
Lecture Imaging of lower airway and lung
Discussion Pulmonary case discussion
Lecture Imaging of exotic species
Discussion Exotic animal case discussion
Imaging discussion sets
(Pre-clinical students)
Discussion Imaging case discussion
Discussion Imaging case discussion
Discussion Imaging case discussion
Discussion Imaging case discussion
Discussion Imaging case discussion
Discussion Imaging case discussion

RECOMMENDED

TEXTBOOKS

  • Textbook of Veterinary Diagnostic Radiology, 5th edition, edited by Thrall
  • Small Animal Diagnostic Ultrasound, 2nd edition, edited by Nyland and Mattoon
  • The Handbook of Veterinary Contrast Radiography, by Seth T. Wallack

Get in touch with us

LECTURE SAMPLE – Dr. Pollard

Lectures are typically 50 minutes long and cover specific imaging topics essential for a basic understanding of veterinary diagnostic imaging. Lectures can be delivered in a pre-recorded format as seen in this sample with an option for translation into different languages. Alternatively, lectures can be delivered remotely but live so that students can ask questions through the chat and answer questions asked by the instructor in real-time.

DISCUSSION SAMPLE – Dr. Pollard

Discussion sessions are typically 110 minutes long and are used to reinforce and expand upon topic delivered in lecture. Discussions are case-based and interactive. They can be delivered in a pre-recorded format as seen in this sample with an option for translation into different languages. Live discussion sessions are best suited for groups of 40 students or less where students are given access to case material ahead of time and will be expected to interpret images when called upon by the instructor. Some discussion sessions are topically aligned with lectures while others are aimed at pre-clinical students and involve a variety of types of cases with varying levels of difficulty.

LECTURE SAMPLE – Dr. Hartman

Lectures are typically 50 minutes long and cover specific imaging topics essential for a basic understanding of veterinary diagnostic imaging. Lectures can be delivered in a pre-recorded format as seen in this sample with an option for translation into different languages. Alternatively, lectures can be delivered remotely but live so that students can ask questions through the chat and answer questions asked by the instructor in real-time.